Can you provide the name of the referee who officiated the 1972 UEFA Super Cup final?

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By Laurie Baratti

The 1972 UEFA Super Cup final

The UEFA Super Cup is an annual football competition contested by the winners of the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League. The first edition of this competition was held in 1972, between the winners of the 1971-72 European Cup (Ajax) and the 1971-72 UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup (Rangers). The match was played over two legs, with Ajax winning 6-3 on aggregate. However, one crucial piece of information about this historic match remains unknown: the name of the referee who officiated it.

The role of a referee in football

The role of a referee in football is to enforce the laws of the game and ensure that the match is played fairly and safely. Referees have the power to award free kicks, penalties, and yellow or red cards for fouls committed by players. They also have the authority to stop or abandon a match if necessary, due to player injury, crowd trouble, or other unforeseen circumstances. A good referee is one who is impartial, knowledgeable, and able to make accurate decisions under pressure.

Who officiated the 1972 UEFA Super Cup final?

Despite extensive research, the name of the referee who officiated the 1972 UEFA Super Cup final has remained elusive. The match was played on 9 and 23 January 1973, but there is no record of who the referee was. This is surprising, given the importance of the match and the fact that UEFA has kept comprehensive records of its competitions for many years.

Possible sources for finding referee’s name

There are several possible sources for finding the name of the referee who officiated the 1972 UEFA Super Cup final. These include historical records and archives, UEFA’s official records and publications, press reports and media coverage, interviews with players and officials, and personal accounts and memories. However, each of these sources has its own strengths and limitations, and it may be difficult to find conclusive evidence.

Historical records and archives

Historical records and archives are a valuable source of information about past football matches, including the names of referees. However, many of these records may be incomplete or unavailable, particularly for matches played many years ago. In addition, the quality and reliability of these records can vary widely, depending on the source and the level of detail provided.

UEFA’s official records and publications

UEFA’s official records and publications are a primary source of information about its competitions, including the UEFA Super Cup. However, these records may not always be complete or accurate, particularly for matches played many years ago. In addition, they may not include the names of referees, or may provide conflicting information.

Press reports and media coverage

Press reports and media coverage are a rich source of information about past football matches, including the names of referees. However, these reports may be biased or incomplete, depending on the journalist and the publication. In addition, they may not provide the level of detail needed to identify the referee.

Interviews with players and officials

Interviews with players and officials can provide valuable insights into past football matches, including the names of referees. However, these interviews may be selective or unreliable, depending on the memory and perspective of the interviewee. In addition, they may not be available or may be difficult to access.

Personal accounts and memories

Personal accounts and memories can provide a unique perspective on past football matches, including the names of referees. However, these accounts may be subjective or unreliable, depending on the memory and perspective of the individual. In addition, they may be difficult to verify or corroborate.

Challenges of identifying referees from the past

Identifying referees from the past can be challenging, due to a number of factors. These include the lack of comprehensive records, the passage of time, the loss of key witnesses, and the lack of technology and communication tools available today. In addition, there may be political or cultural barriers to accessing certain sources of information.

Conclusion: The quest for the missing name

Despite the challenges, the quest for the name of the referee who officiated the 1972 UEFA Super Cup final continues. By drawing on a variety of sources, including historical records, official publications, press reports, interviews, and personal accounts, it may be possible to piece together a more complete picture of this historic match. Ultimately, however, the identity of the referee may remain a mystery, reminding us of the limitations of our knowledge and the fleeting nature of sporting events.

Acknowledgments and references

This article was written with the help of various sources, including UEFA’s official website, historical archives, and media reports. Special thanks to the UEFA Library and Information Centre, the National Football Museum, and the British Library for their assistance.

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Laurie Baratti

Laurie Baratti, a renowned San Diego journalist, has contributed to respected publications like TravelAge West, SPACE, Modern Home + Living, Montage, and Sandals Life. She's a passionate travel writer, constantly exploring beyond California. Besides her writing, Laurie is an avid equestrian and dedicated pet owner. She's a strong advocate for the Oxford comma, appreciating the richness of language.

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