English Exports to the New England Colonies

Travel Destinations

By Omar Perez

The New England Colonies, established by England in the early 17th century, were a vital part of England’s colonial expansion in North America. These colonies were known for their diverse economy, religious tolerance, and strong ties to England. England sent a variety of resources and goods to support the growth and development of the colonies.

One of the most important resources sent from England to the New England Colonies was people. England encouraged its citizens to settle in the colonies by offering incentives such as land grants and religious freedom. Many English farmers, merchants, and craftsmen saw the colonies as an opportunity for a better life and eagerly made the journey across the Atlantic Ocean.

In addition to people, England sent a wide range of supplies and materials to the New England Colonies. This included tools and equipment for farming, fishing, and manufacturing. England also sent textiles and finished goods to meet the needs of the growing population. These supplies were essential for the colonists to build and sustain their communities in the harsh New England environment.

Furthermore, England sent ideas and institutions that helped shape the New England Colonies. The colonists adopted English common law, which provided a framework for their legal system. They also brought with them the English tradition of representative government, which laid the foundation for the development of democratic institutions in the colonies. England’s influence on the political and legal systems of the New England Colonies was evident throughout their history.

In conclusion, England played a crucial role in the development of the New England Colonies by sending people, supplies, and ideas. These resources provided the foundation for the growth and success of the colonies and helped shape their unique identity. The relationship between England and the New England Colonies was a complex and mutually beneficial one, with each side contributing to the success of the other.

The Establishment of the New England Colonies

The New England Colonies were established by English settlers during the 17th century. These colonies, consisting of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Hampshire, were founded for various reasons, including religious freedom, economic opportunities, and the desire for self-governance.

One of the key motivations for the establishment of the New England Colonies was religious freedom. Many of the settlers were Puritans who wanted to escape religious persecution in England. They sought a place where they could practice their faith freely and create a more pious society. The colony of Massachusetts, for example, was founded by the Puritans in 1630 with the goal of creating a “city upon a hill” to serve as an example of religious and moral purity.

In addition to religious motivations, economic opportunities also played a significant role in the establishment of the New England Colonies. The colonists saw the bountiful natural resources of the region, including timber, fish, and fur-bearing animals, as valuable commodities. They also recognized the potential for trade with indigenous peoples and other European colonies. The desire for economic prosperity was a driving force behind the establishment of colonies such as Connecticut, which was founded by English settlers in 1636 as a trading post.

The establishment of the New England Colonies also reflected a desire for self-governance. The colonists wanted to establish their own governments and have a say in the laws and policies that would govern their daily lives. For example, the colonists in Rhode Island, founded by Roger Williams in 1636, established a government based on religious toleration and separation of church and state. This commitment to self-governance and individual freedoms was a central principle of the New England Colonies.

Overall, the establishment of the New England Colonies was driven by a combination of religious, economic, and political factors. The colonists sought religious freedom, economic opportunities, and the ability to govern themselves. These motivations laid the foundation for the unique culture and history of the New England Colonies, which would go on to play a significant role in the formation of the United States.

Trade and Commerce

The trade and commerce between England and the New England colonies played a crucial role in the development and survival of the early colonies. England sent a variety of goods, raw materials, and manufactured products to the colonies, while the colonies primarily exported raw materials back to England.

Importation of Goods:

England supplied the New England colonies with a wide range of goods and products. These included textiles, clothing items, tools, household goods, furniture, and luxury items. The colonies heavily relied on England for these goods, as their own manufacturing capabilities were limited at this time.

One of the most significant imports from England was agricultural equipment, particularly iron plows and tools. These tools helped the colonists increase their productivity and improve farming practices.

Exportation of Raw Materials:

The New England colonies, in turn, primarily exported raw materials back to England. These raw materials included timber, fish, fur, and agricultural products such as wheat and corn.

Triangular Trade:

The trade between England and the New England colonies was part of the larger triangular trade system. This system involved trade routes between Europe, Africa, and the Americas. England sent goods to the colonies, which were then exchanged for raw materials. These raw materials were then transported back to England, where they were processed and turned into finished goods.

Overall, the trade and commerce between England and the New England colonies created a mutually beneficial relationship. England provided the colonies with necessary goods and products, while the colonies supplied England with valuable raw materials. This trade played a significant role in the economic growth and development of both England and the New England colonies.

Agricultural Products

England sent a variety of agricultural products to the New England colonies. These products played a crucial role in shaping the economy and daily life of the colonists. One of the most important agricultural products was wheat. England had a surplus of wheat, which it exported to the colonies to meet their high demand for this staple food.

In addition to wheat, England also sent barley and oats to the New England colonies. These grains were used to make bread, porridge, and other food items. They were essential for the survival of the colonists, who relied heavily on agriculture for their sustenance.

Another agricultural product that England sent to the colonies was livestock. Cattle, sheep, and pigs were brought to the New England colonies for farming purposes. These animals provided a source of food, such as beef, mutton, and pork, as well as raw materials like wool and leather.

Furthermore, England sent various fruits and vegetables to the New England colonies. Apples, pears, and cherries were among the fruits that were brought over. These fruits were used for eating as well as for making cider, a popular alcoholic beverage. Vegetables like onions, potatoes, and peas were also sent to the colonies to supplement their food supply.

The agricultural products sent by England were crucial in sustaining the early colonists in the New England colonies. They not only provided the colonists with food but also served as raw materials for various industries, such as textile production. The availability of these agricultural products from England helped the colonies to flourish and grow.

Natural Resources

The New England colonies were rich in natural resources, which played a crucial role in their economic development. England, recognizing the potential of these resources, often sent requests to the colonies to supply specific goods.

One of the significant natural resources in the New England colonies was timber. The region had an abundance of dense forests, providing an ample supply of wood for various purposes. England relied heavily on this resource for shipbuilding, as the sturdy and plentiful timber was perfect for constructing ships to expand their naval power.

Additionally, New England had an abundance of fish in its coastal waters. England recognized the value of this resource and encouraged the colonies to engage in fishing to meet the demand for fish in the European markets. Fish, such as cod, herring, and mackerel, were caught and preserved in salt for transportation back to England, where they were highly sought after.

The New England colonies also had fertile land suitable for agriculture, particularly in Connecticut River Valley and parts of Massachusetts. England requested the colonies to cultivate crops such as corn, wheat, barley, and rye, as well as grow fruits and vegetables. These agricultural products were crucial in sustaining the growing population and meeting England’s demand for food.

Lastly, the New England colonies had an abundance of granite, marble, and other types of stone. England encouraged the colonies to quarry and export these resources as building materials. The granite from the colonies was used to construct structures such as bridges, buildings, and monuments in England, further fueling their economic growth.

In conclusion, the New England colonies boasted rich natural resources that contributed significantly to their economic development. England recognized the value of these resources and often called upon the colonies to supply timber, fish, agricultural products, and stone. This exchange of resources played a crucial role in shaping the relationship between the colonies and England during this time.

Cultural and Intellectual Exchange

Along with physical goods, England also sent a wealth of cultural and intellectual ideas to the New England colonies. These ideas helped shape the development of the colonies and influence their cultural and intellectual pursuits.

One major aspect of cultural exchange was the English language. English settlers brought their language with them, and it quickly became the dominant language of the colonies. This allowed for a common means of communication and helped establish a sense of shared identity.

English colonists also brought with them their religious beliefs and practices. Puritans, for example, sought to establish a “city upon a hill” based on their religious principles. They founded New England towns that were centered around their churches and relied heavily on scripture for guidance in daily life. These religious beliefs influenced the values and norms of the colonies.

Intellectual exchange was facilitated through the establishment of schools and universities in the colonies. The first public school in the colonies, the Boston Latin School, was founded in 1635. It provided a classical education based on the teachings of ancient Greek and Roman thinkers.

Furthermore, the establishment of Harvard College in 1636 was a significant development in intellectual exchange. The college aimed to educate ministers to spread the Gospel, but it also provided a broader education in subjects such as Latin, Greek, and logic. This helped introduce the colonies to European ideas and philosophies.

The printing press played a crucial role in facilitating cultural and intellectual exchange as well. The first American printing press was established in 1638 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This allowed for the dissemination of books, pamphlets, and newspapers, providing access to a wider range of ideas and information.

Overall, the cultural and intellectual exchange between England and the New England colonies played a fundamental role in shaping the identity, values, and educational pursuits of the colonies. It allowed for the transmission of ideas, language, and beliefs, contributing to the development of a distinct colonial society.

Legacy and Impact

The goods and resources sent by England to the New England colonies had a lasting legacy and impact on both sides of the Atlantic. The colonial trade with England helped to establish a thriving economy in the colonies, which laid the foundation for future economic growth and prosperity.

One of the most significant legacies of the colonial trade was the establishment of a shipping industry in the New England colonies. The trade with England led to the growth of shipbuilding and maritime commerce in the region, which became a vital part of the colonial economy. This legacy continued into the founding of the United States, as New England became a hub for maritime trade and played a crucial role in the development of the American shipping industry.

The goods sent from England also had a profound impact on the daily lives of the colonists. The availability of manufactured goods like clothing, tools, and furniture from England improved the standard of living in the colonies. The colonists had access to a wider range of products and technologies, which contributed to the development of a more modern and comfortable lifestyle.

Furthermore, the legacy of the colonial trade is evident in the cultural and social aspects of the New England colonies. The British influence, as reflected in the goods and materials brought from England, shaped the architecture, fashion, and cuisine of the colonies. The colonists adopted English customs and traditions, which are still visible in New England today.

Overall, the trade relationship between England and the New England colonies had a lasting impact on both regions. It contributed to the economic growth and development of the colonies, helped establish a shipping industry, improved the standard of living, and influenced the culture and society of the region. The legacy of this trade continues to be felt today in the cultural heritage of New England.

Video:

The New England Colonies | DAILY BELLRINGER

Photo of author

Omar Perez

Omar Perez, a Caribbean correspondent at TravelAsker, is a skilled writer with a degree from Florida International University. He has published in prestigious outlets like The Miami Herald, Orlando Weekly, Miami Daily Business Review, and various New Times editions. He has also worked as a stringer for The New York Times in Miami, combining his love for travel and storytelling to vividly depict the Caribbean's charm.

Leave a Comment