What country boasts the longest section of the Nile River?

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By Kristy Tolley

The Nile River

The Nile River is one of the most iconic and historically significant rivers in the world. It is the longest river in the world and has been the lifeblood of many civilizations throughout history. The Nile is a major source of freshwater, and it supports a rich ecosystem that is home to an array of wildlife. In this article, we will explore the countries that the Nile River runs through and which country boasts the longest section of the Nile River.

The length of the Nile River

The Nile River is approximately 6,650 kilometers (4,130 miles) long and is generally regarded as the longest river in the world. The Nile’s source is often considered to be Lake Victoria, which is located in Uganda, although there is some debate among geographers about whether this is the true source. The Nile flows through several countries in East Africa and North Africa before it empties into the Mediterranean Sea.

The countries that the Nile River runs through

The Nile River flows through eleven countries: Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, South Sudan, Sudan, and Egypt. The river is a vital source of water for these countries, and it has been used for irrigation, transportation, and other purposes for thousands of years.

The longest section of the Nile River

The Nile River can be divided into three main sections: the White Nile, the Blue Nile, and the Atbara River. The White Nile is the longest section, and it stretches from Lake Victoria to Khartoum, Sudan. The Blue Nile is the source of most of the Nile’s water, and it flows from Ethiopia to Sudan, where it joins the White Nile. The Atbara River is a tributary of the Nile that flows through Sudan.

Which country has the longest section?

The question of which country has the longest section of the Nile River is a matter of some debate. Egypt and South Sudan both claim to have the longest section, and there is no clear consensus on the matter.

Egypt’s claim to the longest section

Egypt claims that it has the longest section of the Nile River, stretching from the city of Aswan to the river’s delta in the Mediterranean Sea. This section of the river is approximately 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) long, and it is the section that is most commonly associated with the Nile River. Egypt has historically been the dominant power along the Nile, and it has used the river for irrigation, transportation, and other purposes for thousands of years.

South Sudan’s claim to the longest section

South Sudan, which gained independence from Sudan in 2011, claims that it has the longest section of the Nile River. South Sudan’s claim is based on the fact that the White Nile, which is the longest section of the Nile, flows through its territory for a longer distance than it does through Egypt. South Sudan argues that this makes it the rightful owner of the longest section of the river.

The dispute over the longest section

The dispute over which country has the longest section of the Nile River is a complex and contentious issue. It is rooted in historical, political, and economic factors, and it is unlikely to be resolved anytime soon. The Nile River is a vital resource for both Egypt and South Sudan, and the two countries have conflicting interests when it comes to the management and use of the river.

The importance of the Nile River

The Nile River is of immense importance to the countries through which it flows. It provides water for irrigation, which is essential for agriculture, and it supports a rich ecosystem that is home to many species of plants and animals. The Nile is also an important transportation route, and it has been used for trade and commerce for centuries.

Conclusion: The longest section still contested

In conclusion, the question of which country boasts the longest section of the Nile River is still contested. Egypt and South Sudan both have legitimate claims to the title, and the issue is likely to remain unresolved for the foreseeable future. Regardless of which country has the longest section, the Nile River will continue to be an important resource for the region, and its management and use will remain a complex and contentious issue.

References and further reading

  • "Nile River." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., n.d. Web. 2 Aug. 2021.
  • "Nile River." National Geographic Society. National Geographic Society, n.d. Web. 2 Aug. 2021.

Endnotes

  1. "Nile River." Encyclopædia Britannica.
  2. "Nile River." National Geographic Society.
Photo of author

Kristy Tolley

Kristy Tolley, an accomplished editor at TravelAsker, boasts a rich background in travel content creation. Before TravelAsker, she led editorial efforts at Red Ventures Puerto Rico, shaping content for Platea English. Kristy's extensive two-decade career spans writing and editing travel topics, from destinations to road trips. Her passion for travel and storytelling inspire readers to embark on their own journeys.

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