What is the creation date of the Asian Gallery at the New South Wales Art Gallery?

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By Kristy Tolley

The New South Wales Art Gallery, located in Sydney, is one of the leading art galleries in Australia. It houses an extensive collection of Australian and international art, spanning from ancient times to the present day. Amongst its many galleries is the Asian Gallery, which showcases the rich artistic traditions of Asia. In this article, we will explore the creation date of the Asian Gallery, its history, collections, significance, and future plans.

The New South Wales Art Gallery was established in 1871 and is one of the oldest art museums in Australia. The gallery’s collection includes over 30,000 works of art, including Australian, European, Asian, and Aboriginal art. Since its inception, the gallery has gone through numerous expansions and renovations to cater to the growing collection and visitor numbers. Today, the gallery is a cultural hub that attracts over a million visitors annually from all over the world.

The Asian Gallery at the New South Wales Art Gallery was established in 2003, following a significant donation from James Fairfax, a prominent Australian philanthropist. The gallery houses one of the most comprehensive collections of Asian art in Australia, with over 5,000 objects from various countries such as China, Japan, Korea, India, and Southeast Asia. The Asian Gallery was designed to showcase the diverse art and cultural traditions of Asia, reflecting the gallery’s commitment to promoting cultural diversity and understanding.

The Asian Gallery was designed by Sydney-based architects Johnson Pilton Walker. The gallery is located on the ground floor of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, adjacent to the Australian Galleries. The gallery’s design draws inspiration from traditional Asian architecture, with an emphasis on creating a tranquil and contemplative space for visitors to engage with the artworks. The gallery’s interior is illuminated by natural light, creating a warm and inviting atmosphere that complements the artworks on display.

The Asian Gallery features a wide range of artworks, including paintings, sculptures, ceramics, textiles, and works on paper. The gallery’s collection includes both ancient and contemporary works of art, reflecting the diversity and richness of Asian artistic traditions. Some of the notable works on display include the Chinese jade carvings, Japanese screens, and Indian miniature paintings.

The Asian Gallery plays a crucial role in promoting cross-cultural dialogue and understanding amongst visitors. The gallery’s collection provides a unique perspective on Asian art and culture, highlighting the similarities and differences between different countries and regions. The Asian Gallery also serves as a platform for contemporary Asian artists, providing a space for them to showcase their works and engage with audiences.

Renovation and expansion

In 2019, the New South Wales Art Gallery announced plans for a major renovation and expansion of the Asian Gallery. The renovation will include the installation of new exhibition spaces, improved lighting and display cases, and the digitization of the collection. The renovation is expected to be completed by 2022, and it will significantly enhance the gallery’s capacity to showcase the rich artistic traditions of Asia.

The Asian Gallery is currently open to the public, showcasing the diverse and rich artistic traditions of Asia. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the gallery has implemented various safety measures to ensure the safety of visitors, including timed entry, increased sanitation, and social distancing protocols. Visitors can also access the gallery’s collection online through its website, which provides an immersive virtual tour of the gallery and its artworks.

Achievements and Awards

The Asian Gallery has received numerous awards and accolades for its contribution to the promotion of cross-cultural dialogue and understanding. In 2014, the gallery was awarded the prestigious Museums & Galleries National Award for Best Exhibition, for its exhibition "The First Emperor: China’s Entombed Warriors". The exhibition attracted over 330,000 visitors, making it one of the most successful exhibitions in the gallery’s history.

The Asian Gallery is committed to promoting cultural diversity and understanding through its collection and exhibitions. The gallery’s future plans include the expansion of its collection, the development of new partnerships with museums and galleries in Asia, and the continued engagement with contemporary Asian artists. The gallery’s upcoming renovation and expansion will also provide new opportunities to showcase the richness and diversity of Asian art and culture.

Conclusion

The Asian Gallery at the New South Wales Art Gallery provides a unique perspective on Asian art and culture. Through its diverse collection and exhibitions, the gallery promotes cross-cultural dialogue and understanding, highlighting the similarities and differences between different countries and regions. The gallery’s upcoming renovation and expansion will enhance its capacity to showcase the rich artistic traditions of Asia, ensuring that it remains a vital cultural hub for years to come.

References

  1. "About Us." Art Gallery of New South Wales, https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/about-us/. Accessed 9 August 2021.
  2. "Asian Art." Art Gallery of New South Wales, . Accessed 9 August 2021.
  3. "Asian Gallery." Art Gallery of New South Wales, . Accessed 9 August 2021.
  4. "The First Emperor: China’s Entombed Warriors." Art Gallery of New South Wales, . Accessed 9 August 2021.
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Kristy Tolley

Kristy Tolley, an accomplished editor at TravelAsker, boasts a rich background in travel content creation. Before TravelAsker, she led editorial efforts at Red Ventures Puerto Rico, shaping content for Platea English. Kristy's extensive two-decade career spans writing and editing travel topics, from destinations to road trips. Her passion for travel and storytelling inspire readers to embark on their own journeys.

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