What is the number of sections present in Arlington National Cemetery?

Tourist Attractions

By Kristy Tolley

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery is a solemn and sacred place located in Arlington, Virginia. It is the final resting place of over 400,000 men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces, including presidents, Supreme Court justices, and Medal of Honor recipients. The cemetery is a national symbol of honor, sacrifice, and patriotism.

History of Arlington National Cemetery

The land where Arlington National Cemetery now stands was once the estate of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. During the Civil War, the Union Army seized the property and began using it as a burial ground for soldiers. In 1864, the cemetery was officially established and named Arlington National Cemetery. Since then, it has become the most prestigious military cemetery in the United States and a symbol of the sacrifices made by the men and women who have served our country.

Layout and Design of the Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery spans over 600 acres and is divided into several sections. The cemetery’s design is based on the neoclassical style of ancient Greece and Rome, with rows of white headstones, sweeping vistas, and grand monuments. The cemetery is divided into several sections, each with its own unique character and history.

The Number of Sections in Arlington Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery is divided into 70 sections, each with its own number and name. The sections are arranged in a grid pattern, with the oldest sections in the center and the newer sections on the outskirts. The sections are further divided into smaller plots, where individual graves are located.

Section 1: The First and Oldest Section

Section 1 is the oldest section of Arlington National Cemetery and contains the graves of soldiers from the Civil War, including the graves of Union Army General Philip Kearny and Confederate General Montgomery Meigs. Section 1 is also the burial site of the Unknown Soldier from World War I, whose tomb is guarded 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by the Army’s 3rd Infantry Regiment, known as the "Old Guard."

Section 2: The Second Oldest Section

Section 2 is the second oldest section of the cemetery and contains the graves of soldiers from the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. Notable burials in Section 2 include General John J. Pershing, the commander of American forces in World War I, and astronaut Roger Chaffee, who was killed in the Apollo 1 fire.

Sections 3-13: The Rest of the Original Sections

Sections 3-13 were added to Arlington National Cemetery in the late 1800s and early 1900s and contain the graves of soldiers from the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II, as well as some veterans from earlier conflicts. Many notable figures are buried in these sections, including the Kennedy family, Supreme Court justices, and Medal of Honor recipients.

Sections 14-15: The Newest Sections

Sections 14 and 15 are the newest sections of Arlington National Cemetery and were added in the 1970s and 1980s. These sections contain the graves of soldiers who served in Korea, Vietnam, and other conflicts. Notable burials in these sections include comedian and actor Robin Williams, and Army Staff Sergeant Salvatore Giunta, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in Afghanistan.

Notable Burials in Each Section

Each section of Arlington National Cemetery contains many notable burials, including military leaders, politicians, and cultural icons. Some of the most famous burials in the cemetery include President John F. Kennedy, General George C. Marshall, and Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

Maintaining and Preserving the Cemetery

Maintaining and preserving Arlington National Cemetery is a top priority for the United States government. The cemetery is maintained by the Department of the Army, and a team of dedicated professionals works to keep the grounds in pristine condition. The cemetery is also the site of ongoing preservation efforts, including the restoration of historic monuments and the conservation of the cemetery’s natural resources.

Visiting Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery is open to the public year-round and is accessible by car, public transportation, and tour buses. Visitors can take guided tours of the cemetery, watch the Changing of the Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and pay their respects at the graves of loved ones or fallen heroes.

Conclusion: The Importance of Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery is a national treasure and a testament to the sacrifices of the men and women who have served our country. It is a place of solemn remembrance, where visitors can pay their respects to those who have given their lives in service to our nation. The cemetery is a symbol of our collective history and a reminder of the values that make America great: honor, sacrifice, and patriotism.

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Kristy Tolley

Kristy Tolley, an accomplished editor at TravelAsker, boasts a rich background in travel content creation. Before TravelAsker, she led editorial efforts at Red Ventures Puerto Rico, shaping content for Platea English. Kristy's extensive two-decade career spans writing and editing travel topics, from destinations to road trips. Her passion for travel and storytelling inspire readers to embark on their own journeys.

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