What is the number of steps required to ascend to the crown of the Statue of Liberty?

Tourist Attractions

By Kristy Tolley

The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture located on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. The statue is a symbol of freedom and was gifted to the United States by France in 1886. It stands at 305 feet tall from the base to the tip of the flame and has become an iconic landmark of the United States.

The Crown of the Statue of Liberty

The crown of the Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable features of the statue. It consists of seven spikes, with each spike representing a different continent of the world. The crown was originally designed to be a balcony, allowing visitors to enjoy the view of New York Harbor. However, due to safety concerns, the crown was closed to the public for many years. The crown was eventually reopened in 2009, but with limited access and strict safety regulations.

History of the Crown Access

Access to the crown was first granted to visitors in 1916, but it was closed in 1917 due to safety concerns during World War I. The crown was reopened in 1924, but access remained limited. In 1937, the crown was closed to the public permanently due to safety concerns and World War II. In 1984, the crown was partially reopened to visitors, but only to the first level. It wasn’t until 2009 that the crown was fully reopened to the public with limited access.

Statue of Liberty Crown Access Today

Today, access to the crown is limited to a certain number of visitors per day and requires a reservation. Visitors must also undergo a security screening before ascending to the crown. The climb to the crown is not for the faint of heart, as it involves navigating 393 narrow, spiral steps.

Height and Number of Steps

The crown of the Statue of Liberty is located 305 feet above the ground. To reach the crown, visitors must climb 393 steps in total.

First Level of Crown Access

The first level of the crown provides visitors with a stunning view of New York Harbor, but only allows them to look out through narrow windows. Access to the second level requires climbing a ladder and is only permitted for park rangers.

Second Level of Crown Access

The second level of the crown is only accessible by park rangers and provides a breathtaking view of the inside of the statue and its structure.

Third Level of Crown Access

The third level of the crown is only accessible by park rangers and is the highest point visitors can go inside the statue. It provides a spectacular view of the inside structure and the harbor.

Fourth Level of Crown Access

The fourth level of the crown is not accessible to visitors and is used for maintenance purposes.

Fifth Level of Crown Access

The fifth level of the crown is also not accessible to visitors and is used for emergency purposes.

Sixth Level of Crown Access

The sixth level of the crown is the topmost level accessible to visitors. It provides a breathtaking 360-degree view of New York Harbor and the surrounding area.

Conclusion: Ascending to the Crown of the Statue of Liberty

Ascending to the crown of the Statue of Liberty is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. It requires stamina, courage, and a love of heights. The climb is challenging, but the views from the top are worth it. Visitors must plan ahead for their trip to the crown by making a reservation and following all safety regulations. The crown of the Statue of Liberty remains a symbol of freedom and a testament to human achievement.

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Kristy Tolley

Kristy Tolley, an accomplished editor at TravelAsker, boasts a rich background in travel content creation. Before TravelAsker, she led editorial efforts at Red Ventures Puerto Rico, shaping content for Platea English. Kristy's extensive two-decade career spans writing and editing travel topics, from destinations to road trips. Her passion for travel and storytelling inspire readers to embark on their own journeys.

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