Which body of water lies to the north of the Beaufort Sea?

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By Laurie Baratti

The Beaufort Sea is a part of the Arctic Ocean located north of Alaska and Canada. It is an important body of water known for its unique ecology and vast reserves of oil and gas. In this article, we will explore the geography of the Beaufort Sea and the body of water lying to its north.

Basic Geography of the Beaufort Sea

The Beaufort Sea is a shallow, marginal sea that covers approximately 184,000 square miles. It is bounded by Alaska to the west, Canada to the east, and the Arctic Ocean to the north. The sea is relatively shallow, with an average depth of only 230 feet, and is ice-covered for much of the year. The sea is fed by several large rivers, including the Mackenzie River, which empties into the sea near the town of Tuktoyaktuk.

Overview of the Arctic Ocean

The Arctic Ocean is the smallest and shallowest of the world’s oceans, covering an area of approximately 5.4 million square miles. It is located mostly in the Arctic region and is surrounded by the land masses of North America, Europe, and Asia. The Arctic Ocean is known for its frozen waters, with much of its surface covered by sea ice. The ocean is home to a variety of life, including polar bears, walruses, and several species of whales.

Geographical Location of Arctic Ocean

The Arctic Ocean is located at the northernmost part of the Earth, centered on the North Pole. It is bordered by the land masses of North America, Europe, and Asia, and is connected to the Pacific Ocean through the Bering Strait and to the Atlantic Ocean through the Greenland Sea.

Comparison of Arctic Ocean with Other Oceans

Compared to the other oceans of the world, the Arctic Ocean is relatively small and shallow. It has an average depth of only 3,240 feet, compared to the Pacific Ocean’s average depth of 12,100 feet. The Arctic Ocean is also much colder than the other oceans, with an average temperature of only 28 degrees Fahrenheit.

Which Body of Water Lies North of Beaufort Sea?

To the north of the Beaufort Sea lies the Arctic Ocean. However, there is also a smaller body of water known as the "Polar Sea" or "Wandel Sea" that lies further north, between Greenland and the North Pole.

Details of the Body of Water to the North of the Beaufort Sea

The Polar Sea is a small body of water that is mostly covered by sea ice. It is located between Greenland and the North Pole and is connected to the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait. The sea is named after the Norwegian explorer Henry Wandel, who explored the area in the late 19th century.

Physical Features of the Northern Water Body

The Polar Sea is relatively small, covering an area of approximately 150,000 square miles. It is mostly covered by sea ice, with ice-free areas becoming more common in the summer months. The sea is also home to several small islands, including the Svalbard Archipelago and the Franz Josef Land.

Climate of the Water Body to the North of the Beaufort Sea

The climate of the Polar Sea is extremely cold, with temperatures rarely rising above freezing even in the summer months. The sea is also subject to frequent storms and high winds, which can make navigation difficult.

Significance of the Northern Water Body

The Polar Sea is an important area for scientific research, as it is one of the few regions on Earth that remain relatively untouched by human activity. The sea is also home to a variety of unique plant and animal species, including several species of Arctic foxes and reindeer.

Importance of the Beaufort Sea and the Northern Water Body

Both the Beaufort Sea and the Polar Sea are important areas for oil and gas exploration, with several oil companies operating in the region. The Beaufort Sea is also an important area for commercial fishing, with several species of fish and crab found in its waters.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Beaufort Sea and the Polar Sea are both important bodies of water in the Arctic region. While the Beaufort Sea is larger and more well-known, the Polar Sea is an important area for scientific research and is home to a variety of unique plant and animal species. Both seas are also important areas for oil and gas exploration and commercial fishing, highlighting the economic significance of the region.

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Laurie Baratti

Laurie Baratti, a renowned San Diego journalist, has contributed to respected publications like TravelAge West, SPACE, Modern Home + Living, Montage, and Sandals Life. She's a passionate travel writer, constantly exploring beyond California. Besides her writing, Laurie is an avid equestrian and dedicated pet owner. She's a strong advocate for the Oxford comma, appreciating the richness of language.

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