Which Mongolian rivers are fed by a Russian lake?

The Relationship between Russia and Mongolia

Russia and Mongolia share a close relationship, as they are both landlocked nations in Central Asia. The two countries have a common cultural heritage and share a long border. Although Mongolia is an independent nation, it has close economic ties with Russia. The two countries have a history of cooperation in various fields, including trade, education, and military affairs.

Lake Baikal: A Brief Overview

Lake Baikal is the deepest and oldest lake in the world, located in southern Siberia, Russia. It is the largest freshwater lake by volume, containing around 20% of the world’s unfrozen freshwater. The lake is home to over 3,000 species of plants and animals, including the Baikal seal, which is found nowhere else in the world. The lake is also a popular tourist destination, attracting thousands of visitors every year.

Mongolian Rivers: An Overview

Mongolia is a landlocked country in Central Asia, surrounded by Russia to the north and China to the south, east and west. The country is home to several large rivers, including the Selenga, Orkhon, Yenisei, Tuul, and Kherlen rivers. These rivers are essential for the country’s economy and provide water for agriculture, industry and drinking purposes.

How are Mongolian Rivers Fed?

Mongolia’s rivers are mainly fed by snow and glacier melt, as well as rainfall. The amount of water in these rivers varies depending on the season, with high flows in spring and early summer and low flows in winter. Water scarcity is a significant issue in Mongolia due to its arid climate and limited water resources.

The Role of Lake Baikal in Feeding Mongolian Rivers

Lake Baikal plays an essential role in feeding several of Mongolia’s major rivers. The lake acts as a natural reservoir, storing water that eventually flows into nearby rivers. The lake’s water is also a vital source of nutrients, which support a thriving ecosystem in the surrounding region.

The Selenga River: Fed by Lake Baikal

The Selenga River is the largest river in Mongolia, and it is fed by Lake Baikal. The river flows through Mongolia and Russia before eventually emptying into Lake Baikal. The Selenga River provides water for agriculture and industry in Mongolia and is also an important source of fish.

The Orkhon River: Fed by Lake Baikal

The Orkhon River is another major river in Mongolia that is fed by Lake Baikal. The river flows through central Mongolia and is a significant source of water for irrigation and drinking purposes. The Orkhon River is also rich in history, as it played an important role in the rise of the Mongol Empire.

The Yenisei River: Fed by Lake Baikal

The Yenisei River is the largest river system that flows into the Arctic Ocean, and it is also fed by Lake Baikal. The river flows through Russia and eventually empties into the Arctic Ocean. The Yenisei River is an essential source of water and hydroelectric power for Siberia and other regions of Russia.

The Tuul River: Fed by…?

The Tuul River is a significant river in Mongolia, but it is not fed by Lake Baikal. The river originates in the Khentii Mountains in northeastern Mongolia and flows through the capital city of Ulaanbaatar before eventually emptying into the Orkhon River.

The Kherlen River: Fed by…?

The Kherlen River is another major river in Mongolia that is not fed by Lake Baikal. The river originates in the Khentii Mountains and flows through eastern Mongolia before eventually emptying into Lake Hulun. The Kherlen River is an essential source of water for agriculture and industry in the region.

Conclusion: The Importance of Lake Baikal for Mongolia’s Rivers

In conclusion, Lake Baikal plays a crucial role in feeding several of Mongolia’s major rivers. The lake’s water and nutrients support a thriving ecosystem in the surrounding region, and the water from the lake is an essential source of water for agriculture, industry, and drinking purposes in Mongolia. The close relationship between Russia and Mongolia is reflected in the vital role that Lake Baikal plays in sustaining Mongolia’s rivers and its economy.

References

  1. "Lake Baikal." UNESCO World Heritage Centre. https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/754/.
  2. "Mongolia." The World Bank. https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/mongolia.
  3. "Selenga River." Encyclopædia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/place/Selenga-River.
  4. "Orkhon River." Encyclopædia Britannica. .
  5. "Yenisey River." Encyclopædia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/place/Yenisey-River.
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Kristy Tolley

Kristy Tolley, an accomplished editor at TravelAsker, boasts a rich background in travel content creation. Before TravelAsker, she led editorial efforts at Red Ventures Puerto Rico, shaping content for Platea English. Kristy's extensive two-decade career spans writing and editing travel topics, from destinations to road trips. Her passion for travel and storytelling inspire readers to embark on their own journeys.

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