Which rivers and lakes are significant in Taiwan?

Tourist Attractions

By Kristy Tolley

Taiwan’s Water Resources

Taiwan is a small island nation located in East Asia. Despite its small size, Taiwan is rich in water resources with numerous rivers, lakes, and reservoirs that provide water for domestic, agricultural, and industrial purposes. Taiwan’s water resources are critical to the nation’s economy and survival, and the government has implemented various policies and programs to maintain the sustainability of these resources.

The Longest River in Taiwan: The Zhuoshui River

The Zhuoshui River is the longest river in Taiwan, stretching for 186 km from its source in the Central Mountain Range to its mouth in the Taiwan Strait. The river flows through several major cities in Taiwan, including Nantou, Taichung, and Changhua, and is a significant source of water for these urban areas. The Zhuoshui River is also home to various aquatic species, including the critically endangered Formosan landlocked salmon.

The Second Longest River: The Jhuoshuei River

The Jhuoshuei River is the second-longest river in Taiwan, stretching for 159 km from its source in the Central Mountain Range to its mouth in the Taiwan Strait. The river flows through several major cities in Taiwan, including Nantou, Taichung, and Changhua, and is a major source of water for these urban areas. The Jhuoshuei River is also a popular tourist destination, with various scenic spots, such as the Sun Link Sea and the Bagua Mountain Scenic Area.

The Most Famous Lake: Sun Moon Lake

Sun Moon Lake is one of the most famous lakes in Taiwan and is located in Nantou County. The lake is named after its shape, which resembles a sun and a crescent moon. Sun Moon Lake is a popular tourist destination, with several scenic spots, such as the Wenwu Temple and the Ci’en Pagoda. The lake is also an important source of hydroelectric power, with a capacity of over 100 MW.

The Largest Lake: Chiaming Lake

Chiaming Lake is the largest natural lake in Taiwan and is located in Hualien County. The lake covers an area of 3.51 km² and is situated at an elevation of 3,310 meters above sea level. Chiaming Lake is a popular destination for hiking and camping, and its surrounding area is home to several endangered species, such as the Formosan black bear and the Mikado pheasant.

The Third Largest Lake: Tsengwen Reservoir

Tsengwen Reservoir is the third-largest reservoir in Taiwan and is located in Tainan City. The reservoir covers an area of 5.96 km² and has a total storage capacity of 870 million cubic meters. Tsengwen Reservoir is a critical source of water for Tainan City and the surrounding areas, and it also serves as a popular recreational spot for fishing, boating, and jet skiing.

The Fourth Largest Lake: Mingte Reservoir

Mingte Reservoir is the fourth-largest reservoir in Taiwan and is located in Taoyuan City. The reservoir covers an area of 4.2 km² and has a total storage capacity of 200 million cubic meters. Mingte Reservoir is a critical source of water for Taoyuan City and the surrounding areas, and it also serves as a popular spot for recreational activities, such as hiking and bird watching.

The Fifth Largest Lake: Zengwen Reservoir

Zengwen Reservoir is the fifth-largest reservoir in Taiwan and is located in Chiayi County. The reservoir covers an area of 2.77 km² and has a total storage capacity of 480 million cubic meters. Zengwen Reservoir is a critical source of water for Chiayi County and the surrounding areas, and it also serves as a popular spot for fishing and boating.

The Sixth Largest Lake: Wushantou Reservoir

Wushantou Reservoir is the sixth-largest reservoir in Taiwan and is located in Tainan City. The reservoir covers an area of 1.53 km² and has a total storage capacity of 44 million cubic meters. Wushantou Reservoir is a critical source of water for Tainan City and the surrounding areas, and it also serves as a popular spot for recreational activities, such as hiking and bird watching.

The Seventh Largest Lake: Baoshan Reservoir

Baoshan Reservoir is the seventh-largest reservoir in Taiwan and is located in Taipei City. The reservoir covers an area of 1.31 km² and has a total storage capacity of 30 million cubic meters. Baoshan Reservoir is a critical source of water for Taipei City and the surrounding areas, and it also serves as a popular spot for recreational activities, such as fishing and hiking.

The Eighth Largest Lake: Lantan Reservoir

Lantan Reservoir is the eighth-largest reservoir in Taiwan and is located in Tainan City. The reservoir covers an area of 1.15 km² and has a total storage capacity of 27 million cubic meters. Lantan Reservoir is a critical source of water for Tainan City and the surrounding areas, and it also serves as a popular spot for fishing and boating.

Conclusion: The Importance of Water Conservation

Taiwan’s rivers, lakes, and reservoirs are critical to the nation’s survival, and it is crucial to maintain the sustainability of these resources. The government has implemented various policies and programs to promote water conservation and reduce water usage. It is essential for individuals to practice water conservation in their daily lives and work together to ensure the sustainability of Taiwan’s water resources for future generations.

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Kristy Tolley

Kristy Tolley, an accomplished editor at TravelAsker, boasts a rich background in travel content creation. Before TravelAsker, she led editorial efforts at Red Ventures Puerto Rico, shaping content for Platea English. Kristy's extensive two-decade career spans writing and editing travel topics, from destinations to road trips. Her passion for travel and storytelling inspire readers to embark on their own journeys.

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