Which two rivers in the US flow in a northerly direction?

Tourist Attractions

By Erica Silverstein

Seeking Northward-Flowing Rivers in the US

Rivers are an essential component of most ecosystems, and their direction of flow is a critical factor in determining their ecological value. The United States is home to numerous rivers that flow in different directions, including southward, eastward, and westward. However, we will be focusing on the rivers that flow in a northerly direction. In this article, we will examine which two rivers in the US flow northward and explore their unique features.

The Mighty Mississippi River: Flowing Northward?

The Mississippi River is the largest river in the United States and is known for its iconic southward flow. However, it does have a section in its northernmost region where it flows briefly to the north. This section is located in Minnesota, near the city of Bemidji, and is called the Upper Mississippi River. Here, the river flows northward towards Lake Itasca, which is the Mississippi’s source. However, this northward flow is short-lived, and the Mississippi continues its journey southward towards the Gulf of Mexico. While the Mississippi is not a true northward-flowing river, its brief northerly section is still a unique feature of this mighty waterway.

The Fascinating Flow of the St. Croix River

The St. Croix River is a tributary of the Mississippi River and is a unique northward-flowing river. The river’s source is located in the state of Wisconsin, and it flows northward for approximately 164 miles before it joins the Mississippi River near the city of Prescott, Wisconsin. The St. Croix River is known for its scenic beauty, and it has been designated as a National Scenic Riverway. The river is also popular for recreational activities such as fishing, boating, and camping. The St. Croix River is an excellent example of a northward-flowing river in the United States and is a popular destination for nature enthusiasts and outdoor enthusiasts.

The Red River of the North: Flowing Northward?

The Red River of the North is another northward-flowing river in the United States. The river flows northward along the border between North Dakota and Minnesota and eventually empties into Lake Winnipeg in Canada. The river’s name comes from the red clay that is found along its banks, and it is known for its frequent flooding. Despite its flooding, the Red River of the North is a critical water source, and it has been used for irrigation and transportation for centuries. The river is also home to a variety of fish and wildlife species, making it a popular destination for anglers and nature enthusiasts.

The Challenging Course of the Columbia River

The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, and it flows in a predominantly southward direction. However, it does have a section in its northernmost region where it flows northward. This section is located near the border between Oregon and Washington and is called the Columbia River Gorge. The gorge is a narrow canyon that is over 80 miles long and is known for its scenic beauty and challenging whitewater rapids. The Columbia River is an essential water source for the region and is used for irrigation, hydroelectric power generation, and transportation.

The Northward Flow of the Green River

The Green River is a tributary of the Colorado River and is located in the states of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. The river flows northward for approximately 730 miles before it joins the Colorado River in Canyonlands National Park. The Green River is known for its scenic beauty and is a popular destination for recreational activities such as fishing, rafting, and hiking. The river is also home to a variety of fish and wildlife species, including endangered species such as the Colorado pikeminnow and the razorback sucker.

The Peaceful Waters of the Black River

The Black River is a tributary of the White River and is located in the state of Missouri. The river flows northward for approximately 300 miles before it joins the White River near the city of Newport, Arkansas. The Black River is known for its calm and peaceful waters, making it a popular destination for canoeing and kayaking. The river is also home to a variety of fish species, including smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, and catfish.

Northward Flowing Rivers in Alaska

Alaska is home to numerous northward-flowing rivers, and these waterways play a critical role in the state’s ecosystem and culture. Here are some examples of northward-flowing rivers in Alaska.

The Intriguing Flow of the Koyukuk River

The Koyukuk River is located in the interior region of Alaska and flows northward for approximately 425 miles before it empties into the Yukon River. The river is known for its scenic beauty and is a popular destination for recreational activities such as fishing, hunting, and camping. The Koyukuk River is also home to a variety of wildlife species, including moose, caribou, bear, and wolf.

The Alaskan Kobuk River: Flowing Northward?

The Kobuk River is located in the northwestern region of Alaska and flows northward for approximately 280 miles before it empties into the Kotzebue Sound. The river is known for its scenic beauty and is a popular destination for recreational activities such as fishing, hunting, and camping. Despite its importance as a cultural and economic resource, some experts debate whether the Kobuk River should be considered a true northward-flowing river as its direction of flow changes frequently.

The Scenic Charley River: Flowing Northward

The Charley River is located in the northeastern region of Alaska and flows northward for approximately 100 miles before it empties into the Yukon River. The river is known for its scenic beauty and is a popular destination for recreational activities such as fishing, hunting, and camping. The Charley River is also home to a variety of wildlife species, including moose, bear, and wolf.

The Evergreen Kuskokwim River: Flowing Northward?

The Kuskokwim River is located in southwestern Alaska and flows for approximately 702 miles before it empties into the Kuskokwim Bay. The river is known for its scenic beauty and is a popular destination for recreational activities such as fishing, hunting, and camping. However, some experts debate whether the Kuskokwim River should be considered a true northward-flowing river, as its direction of flow changes frequently. Despite this debate, the Kuskokwim River remains a vital resource for the local communities and is home to a variety of fish and wildlife species.

In conclusion, while there are many rivers in the United States, only a few flow in a northerly direction. These rivers have unique features and are essential resources for the regions in which they flow. Whether for recreational activities, irrigation, or transportation, northward-flowing rivers play a crucial role in the ecosystem and culture of their respective regions.

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Erica Silverstein

Erica, a seasoned travel writer with 20+ years of experience, started her career as a Let's Go guidebook editor in college. As the head of Cruise Critic's features team for a decade, she gained extensive knowledge. Her adventurous nature has taken her to Edinburgh, Australia, the Serengeti, and on luxury cruises in Europe and the Caribbean. During her journeys, she enjoys savoring local chocolates and conquering various summits.

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