Which words are inscribed on the Mace of the Scottish parliament?

Travel Destinations

By Wyatt Johnson

The Mace of the Scottish Parliament

The Mace of the Scottish Parliament is a ceremonial staff that represents the authority of the Scottish Parliament. It is carried into the debating chamber at the beginning of each parliamentary session by the Sergeant-at-Arms, who places it on the table in front of the Presiding Officer. The Mace is made of silver and is topped with a crown and a saltire, which is the national symbol of Scotland.

History: The Mace and its Significance

The Mace was first introduced to the Scottish Parliament in 1999, when the Scottish Parliament was reconvened after a hiatus of almost 300 years. The Mace is based on the traditional design of parliamentary maces in the United Kingdom, but with a distinctly Scottish twist. The Mace is a symbol of the authority of the Scottish Parliament, and is used to signify the beginning and end of each parliamentary session. It is also carried by the Sergeant-at-Arms during ceremonial occasions, such as the opening of the Scottish Parliament by the Queen.

The Inscription: What Does it Say?

The Mace of the Scottish Parliament is inscribed with two phrases, one in Latin and one in Scots Gaelic. The Latin phrase is "In My Defens God Me Defend", while the Scots Gaelic phrase is "An t-Allt na Beinne Gu Brath". These phrases are inscribed on the stem of the Mace, just below the crown.

Translation: The Meaning of the Inscription

The inscriptions on the Mace of the Scottish Parliament are significant, as they represent the values and identity of the Scottish Parliament. The Latin phrase translates to "In My Defens God Me Defend", while the Scots Gaelic phrase translates to "The Burn on the Mountain Forever". These phrases are deeply rooted in Scottish history and culture, and reflect the importance of religion, sovereignty, and the natural world to the Scottish people.

The First Half: The Latin Phrase

The Latin phrase "In My Defens God Me Defend" is the motto of the Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland. It was first used by King Robert the Bruce in the 14th century, and has since become a symbol of Scottish identity and independence. The phrase emphasizes the importance of divine protection, and reflects the role of religion in Scottish culture.

The Second Half: The Scots Gaelic Phrase

The Scots Gaelic phrase "An t-Allt na Beinne Gu Brath" translates to "The Burn on the Mountain Forever". This phrase is an ancient Highland saying, and reflects the importance of nature and the environment to the Scottish people. The phrase represents the connection between the Scottish people and the land, and the importance of preserving and respecting the natural world.

Significance: The Importance of the Inscription

The inscriptions on the Mace of the Scottish Parliament represent the values and identity of the Scottish people. They reflect the importance of religion, sovereignty, and the natural world to the Scottish people, and are a symbol of Scottish identity and independence. The inscriptions on the Mace remind us of the rich history and culture of Scotland, and of the importance of these values to the Scottish people.

Symbolism: The Mace and Scottish Identity

The Mace of the Scottish Parliament is a powerful symbol of Scottish identity and independence. It represents the authority of the Scottish Parliament, and is a reminder of the long struggle for Scottish sovereignty. The inscriptions on the Mace reflect the values and identity of the Scottish people, and are a testament to the rich history and culture of Scotland.

Conclusion: The Mace as a Symbol of Scottish Democracy

The Mace of the Scottish Parliament is a symbol of Scottish democracy and independence. Its inscriptions reflect the values and identity of the Scottish people, and are a reminder of the long struggle for Scottish sovereignty. The Mace is a powerful symbol of Scottish democracy, and is a testament to the rich history and culture of Scotland.

References: Sources for Further Reading

  1. The Scottish Parliament: The Mace
  2. Scotland’s National Symbols: The Saltire, the Lion Rampant, the Thistle and the Honours of Scotland
  3. The Guardian: Scottish Parliament Mace to Be Given to National Museum of Scotland
Photo of author

Wyatt Johnson

Wyatt Johnson, a seasoned travel writer and Miami resident, is the driving force behind captivating pieces at TravelAsker. Unveiling the gems of his vibrant city and its serene beach resorts, his articles showcase an array of family-friendly activities. Leveraging his global insights and experiences as a family man, Wyatt becomes your ideal companion, guiding you through the enchanting delights of Miami and the wonders of Florida.

Leave a Comment